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ACT Passive Phase Coupler

Item # CP000

$10.58

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Product Description

Description:
The CP000 is an isolating phase coupler that is used to transfer X10 & A10 command signals generated on one phase of single-phase or a three-phase system to one or two of the remaining phases. It will isolate all phases from each other to prevent trickle-through of line current from an energized phase to an inert phase. Rated for 120 or 277V operation. Signal Ratio is 1:1.

FAQ

ACT Powerline FAQ - Frequently Asked Questions

Powerline FAQ Contents:

FAQ - Transmitters

Q: Why are there no code wheels on ACT transmitters? How do I set the address?
A: Almost all of ACT's newer PCC (X-10 compatible) products utilize "electronic" configuration. Simple "dials" would be insufficient to set all the available functions. While ACT's AT004 (multi-tester-programmer) is usually used to configure ACT PCC devices, any standard X-10 desk top transmitter (controller) will work. See the individual instruction sheets for more information.

Q: What sort of PCC transmitters exist?
A: The simplest transmitters are small units which will fit into standard 2x4 wall boxes (TK124, TK184) which have a keypad for manual operation. There are also small, 6-address interface transmitters (TB134). ACT also manufactures very specialized units for hotel/motel control (TD140), RS232 interface transmitters (TI103) and 64 input, interface transmitters (TI100). All newly designed ACT transmitters offer true 2-way communications capability (see ACT's A10 overview document for more information). Other new transmitters are planned for release in the future.

Q: How many different addresses does the standard X-10 protocol provide?
A: The standard X-10 protocol allows for 256 different addresses arranged in 16 letter unit codes (A-P) each having 16 number, or unit codes (1-16). While 256 is sufficient for most residential customers, ACT's commercial customers have the option of using the extended code set with more addresses, more commands and more capabilities.

Q: Are any of ACT's A10 products capable of more than 256 addresses?
A: Yes! Called "Extended Addressing", many devices allow an installation to have up to 4,096 unique addresses.

Q: Why do none of the ACT PCC transmitters list a current rating?
A: Transmitters do not control loads directly. They simply transmit the PCC signal. They only consume a very small amount of power, typically 10-30 watts. Since there is no load current flowing "through" the transmitters, they have no current rating.

Q: If there is no neutral wire in the wall box, can I use the ground wire?
A: No. This is a violation of the National Electric Code. The ground wire is part of the safety system and is not intended to be a return path for electricity. If no neutral wire exists, and there is no alternative device that can be used, contact a licensed electrician to have a new neutral wire run to the box. (See PCC Tech Tip #1 for more information.)

Q: Does ACT offer 3-way capable A10 receivers?
A: Yes but not in the same way as the older X-10 devices work. In the past, an auxiliary switch (often called a "slave" switch) had no LED to display the state of the controlled load. This was unacceptable in the opinion of ACT. In order to achieve a higher degree of reliability, flexibility and more user options, ACT decided to always use a wall mounted receiver matched to an accompanying wall mount transmitter. In this way, a user near either unit will be able to see the state of load since both have status LED's.

Q: Does ACT offer any receivers capable of more than 256 addresses?
A: Yes. Many of ACT's A10 receivers are capable of being addresses for either standard code with 256 addresses, or for "Extended Addressing" with 4,096 addresses.

FAQ - Receivers

Q: Why are there no code wheels on ACT receivers? How do I set the address?
A: Almost all of ACT's PCC (X-10 compatible) products utilize "electronic" configuration. Simple "dials" would be insufficient to set all the available functions. While ACT's AT004 (multi-tester-programmer) is usually used to configure ACT PCC devices, any standard X-10 desk top transmitter (controller) will work to set the most common options. See the individual instruction sheet for more information.

Q. What sort of ACT PCC receivers exist?
A: While most residential distributors of X-10 compatible receivers sell mostly plug-in receivers, ACT sells mostly hard-wired 120v, 208v, 240v, 277v and 480v receivers. ACT's new A10 units (see the A10 overview document for A10 information) have true 2-way communications, enhanced features, improved reliability and user selectable options.

Q: Why is it that a 240v receiver will not work on 208v?
A: This is actually a more complex question than it appears. In reality, most 240v receivers will operate on 208v if signal exists at 208v. The phase relationship of 3-phase power makes coupling more complex.

Q: Why do most X-10 receivers have 2 wires while ACT receivers have 3 wires?
A: Most X-10 receivers fall into the category of 2-wire dimmers. That means that they are limited to 500 watts of incandescent load only. They do not require a connection to a neutral wire since they get their operating power "through" the load. Most of ACT's receivers require a neutral because they are relay receivers or special dimmer receivers. (See also http://www.act-solutions.com/kingery.htm)

Q: Why are 3-way switch arrangements so hard to do?
A: Converting a standard 3-way circuit to a PCC 3-way can sometimes be difficult because the installer may not realize how many variations there are in wiring a standard 3-way. Since there are so many ways to do one, there are many ways to convert one.

For more information on 3-way and 4-way switch circuits, see:
PCC Tech Tip #6
PCC Tech Tip #7
PCC Tech Tip #8

Q: Does ACT offer 3-way capable A10 receivers?
A: Yes but not in the same way as the older X-10 devices work. In the past, an auxiliary switch (often called a "slave" switch) had no LED to display the state of the controlled load. This was unacceptable in the opinion of ACT. In order to achieve a higher degree of reliability, flexibility and more user options, ACT decided to always use a wall mounted receiver matched to an accompanying wall mount transmitter. In this way, a user near either unit will be able to see the state of load since both have status LED's.

Q: Does ACT offer any receivers capable of more than 256 addresses?
A: Yes. Many of ACT's A10 receivers are capable of being addresses for either standard code with 256 addresses, or for "Extended Addressing" with 4,096 addresses.

FAQ - Passive Couplers

Q: What are the most common PCC problems?
A: The most common problems for residential applications are coupling and inexperience. The most common problem for industrial / commercial applications is electrical pollution (noise). Common questions on coupling will follow, as will questions on filtering.

Q: Does ACT make a "bridge"?
A: In one sense, yes, however "bridge" is not the term we use. ACT prefers the more technically correct term of "Passive Coupler". It is ACT's part number CP000.

Q: How does the CP000 work?
A: Its circuitry consists of a twin tuned design that allows the passage of PCC signals from one leg to the other. When installed at the breaker panel in an installation, it allows for the free travel of PCC signals from one side of the transformer to the other while blocking the high voltage.

Q: Can it be installed inside the panel?
A: While some electrical inspectors may allow it, this is not universally accepted. ACT recommends that it be installed into a standard 2x4 box adjacent to the electrical panel. (See also PCC Tech Tip #4.)

Q: Will the CP000 fix all coupling problems?
A: No. The CP000 can not create, repeat, amplify nor change the position of PCC signals. It can only allow the signal that is already present to freely travel from one part of the panel to the other part of the panel. There are rare instances where it will do more harm than good.

Q: Other than coupling, what is another common problem?
A: Electrical pollution (noise) often disrupts PCC communications.

More information on electrical pollution can be found at:
PCC Tech Tip #9
PCC Tech Tip #10
PCC Tech Tip #11
PCC Tech Tip #12

Q: How can I tell if noise is my problem and what can I do about it?
A: Using the proper test equipment is the best way to troubleshoot but to a lesser degree, simply unplugging some electronic devices will let you know what needs to be filtered. ACT offers 5 amp and 15 amp plug-in filters plus a variety of hardwire filters.

More information on both passive and active coupling can be found at:
PCC Tech Tip #3
PCC Tech Tip #4


FAQ - Active Couplers

Q: If the CP000 will not fix a coupling problem, what are the alternatives?
A: ACT manufactures several different Coupler/Repeaters. One of them will usually be right for the job.

Q: How does an installer know which Coupler/Repeater is right for the job?
A: ACT makes Coupler/Repeaters for residential applications (the CR230 and CR234), for 120/208v 3-phase systems (the CR134), for 277/480v 3-phase systems (the CR334), for Canadian systems and another for 240v 50Hz. The basic repeater will have a "0" at the end of its part number. The complex special repeaters end in a "4". The local ESC has the responsibility of knowing which is right for the job.

Q: How does a Coupler/Repeater work?
A: Simply put, a "CR" receives sections of PCC signals and repeats them back onto the lines. It creates a stronger signal while also accommodating the phase shift associated with 3-phase electrical systems.

Q: Will all ACT Coupler/Repeaters work with "Extended Addressing"?
A: Since "Extended Addressing" is within the "Extended Code 1" protocol, all of ACT's repeaters are designed to accommodate rapid dimming, direct dim commands, scenes and of course, "extended addressing".

Q: Do the ACT "CR's" operate the same as another company's "amplifier"?
A: In one sense, yes. Most X-10 compatible units described as being a "coupling amplifier" are, in reality, true "repeaters". Although somewhat confusing, ACT also manufactures true amplifiers (the CA000 and CA200) but they are almost never used in residential systems.

Q: How does the CA000 amplifier work?
A: Unlike a "CR", a true amplifier has separate input and output wires. It is usually used to amplify PCC signals in order to send them to another distribution system or building.

More information on both passive and active coupling can be found at:
PCC Tech Tip #3
PCC Tech Tip #4


What Is PCC?

As in many industries, Advanced Control Technologies uses acronyms to abbreviate its product lines. "PCC" is merely an abbreviation for Powerline Control Components. Often, we even abbreviate "Advanced Control Technologies" as just "ACT". Most of ACT's "PCC" products operate using the X-10 protocol. The most common method for sending command signals over existing electrical wiring is the X-10 protocol. Although widely used and essentially unchanged for many years, recent improvements have begun to impact the industry. Many of ACT's more recently designed products, take advantage of newer technology to improve the reliability and capability of the original X-10 idea. While most PCC products are made to conform to the standard 256 addresses and command sequence common in many X-10 compatible devices, they also have features available in no other products of comparable price. Other PCC devices go beyond the basic 256 address structure and are capable of far more addresses. Called "Extended Addressing", devices with this feature allow an installation to have up to 4,096 unique addresses, but this is usually reserved for industrial and commercial installations.

All PCCequipment uses the building's own electrical distribution system to communicate and so an unpolluted electrical environment is essential. Specific knowledge and training are required to properly design and install PCC systems. As such, it must be acknowledged that a significant amount of importance is placed on the system designer's training and experience. The ultimate responsibility for the system's success lies with the Engineered Systems Center ("ESC"). The user acknowledges that the application of any ACT PCC equipment to any electrical systems is unique and therefore should be performed by trained installers, adhering to all appropriate electrical codes. Nothing contained in this FAQ is intended to create any liability or engineering responsibility on behalf of Advanced Control Technologies, Inc. While we at ACT will try to provide any training, publications or materials required to assist in the design, implementation and troubleshooting of a system, the ultimate responsibility remains with the designer and those on site.

What is A10?

Nearly all of the changes in PCC products have come about because of the introduction of ACT's "A10" module. Since "A10" is a new term for most people, it is appropriate that we offer this short synopsis of ACT and A10:

Advanced Control Technologies started on September 1, 1987 and began manufacturing Interface Control Components (or "ICC" for short) selling them to the biggest HVAC and Controls companies in the country.

On November 1, 1989, ACT began selling products made for us by X-10 Ltd. Those products used the X-10 protocol to transmit command signals over existing electrical wiring. This product line is called "Powerline Control Components" (or "PCC" for short).

In 1989, nearly every PCC product was made for ACT by X-10 but from the start, ACT engineers began designing new products to fill in the gaps. The TI100 was one example. It was designed and manufactured here in Indiana. It was not made by X-10 Ltd.

In 1998, ACT began a project to make a completely new line of PCC products that would be X-10 compatible, but with more features, better operation and higher reliability. We called it A10 for "Advanced X-10". The products feature improvements on these five main points:

- "X-10 Compatible" means that they use the same protocol. They will work in older X-10 (Leviton, X-10 Pro, ACT PCC) installations. That does not mean that they will always "look" the same, are the same size nor fit in the same box.

- "More Features" means that they are more user-configurable. The user can choose which features to use, and which not to use. They are no longer limited to the "hard-set" functions in X-10 units. They also offer true 2-way communications. You can now ask them their status and they will answer!

- "Better Operation" means that they operate in higher noise levels and lower signal levels. Where other X-10 devices will not work, these will.

- "Higher Reliability" is easy. They work! And they continue to work. They can extract signal out of noisy environments and they transmit more signal power. And they last.

- "More Addresses" means that many of ACT's A10 products are also capable of more than 256 addresses. Called "Extended Addressing", these devices allow an installation to have up to 4,096 unique addresses.

The basis of all ACT's A10 products is the A10 module. (See ACT's A10 overview document for more information.) The A10 module is the "engine", around which most of ACT's new products are be based. It contains all the common components and programming. The A10 module is a small, patented, circuit board (about the size of two postage stamps) which acts as the brain for each new product. The A10 module is not, in itself, a complete product. By itself it can do nothing. Although it is not a "usable" product, ACT does sell them to other manufactures who are designing their products around ACT's A10 engine.

What is X-10?

A detailed explanation of the protocol and its history can be found here.

The X-10 protocol is a popular method of transmitting digital command data over existing electrical wiring. It is important to know that in most cases, this FAQ file will use the term "X-10" whenever referring to the protocol and not necessarily, the company. X-10 Ltd. is the company whose heritage goes back to the company which originated the concept.

The name "X-10" originally referred to the project number, "Experiment #10". It described a method of using high frequency 120kHz pulses to transmit binary data over existing electrical wiring. It is a communications protocol for remote control of electrical devices. It is designed for communications between X-10 compatible transmitters and receivers which communicate on standard electrical wiring.

Transmitters and receivers may be the type that simply plug into standard electrical outlets although most industrial / commercial units are meant to be hardwired into electrical boxes. Transmitters send commands such as "on", "off" preceded by the identification (or address) of the receiver to be controlled. This broadcast goes out over the electrical wiring in a building.

Although most X-10 compatible devices, regardless of the name on them, are manufactured by the X-10 Ltd. company, ACT is an exception. Most of ACT's products are designed and manufactured by ACT in its own facility. ACT is engaged in the design and manufacture of specialty X-10 compatible devices for the remote control and automation marketplace. (See also: PCC Tech Tip #13 which is a detailed explanation of the protocol and its history and "PCC" in this FAQ.)

What is "Extended Addressing"?

In mid-2001, ACT began releasing new versions of existing products with new "Extended Addressing" capability. Most PCC users already understand that there are 256 available addresses in the X-10 protocol. That is 2 to the 8th power, which is a round number, binaurally speaking. Many users also know that "Extended Code 1" does not specifically provide for any more than 256 addresses. However, it doesn't "exclude" them either. Engineers at ACT have taken an unused portion of the X-10 Extended Code protocol to create more addresses.

This FAQ section will help explain "extended addressing":

Q: What are the available standard code addresses?
A: The original protocol divided the 256 available addresses into 16 letters, with each letter having 16 numbers. These standard addresses are often described as "A1" through "P16". To be more accurate, it is a good practice to always use two characters for the number code portion, so instead of simply "1", it is better to use "01" (zero-one). Therefore, the better way to annotate the addresses is to say "A01" through "P16".

Q: How many addresses are available in the "extended address" format?
A: ACT engineers have created a method to expand the original 256 addresses up to 4,096 addresses. In order to have a common method of notation, extended addressing is written as "A01(00)" through "P16(0F)". This is a combination of the notation that was adopted by the original Pico engineers (see the bottom of PCC Tech Tip #13 for more information) and hexadecimal notation. Using this method of addressing, there is no longer just "A01". Users will be able to address a device to sixteen sub-addresses beyond the "A01" address, such as: A01(00), A01(01), A01(02), A01(03), A01(04), A01(05), A01(06), A01(07), A01(08), A01(09), A01(0A), A01(0B), A01(0C), A01(0D), A01(0E) and finally A01(0F).

Q: Is this the same as the "ACT Code" that became available a few years ago and is used in proprietary systems?
A: No. While that powerline protocol is still available for OEM applications that are required to be incompatible with X-10 (for security reasons), this new extended addressing has nothing to do with the existing "ACT protocol".

Q: Is this new "extended addressing" different than X-10's "Extended Code"?
A: No. Extended addressing is "within" the "Extended Code 1" protocol outlined by X-10's own documentation.

Q: How does the new extended addressing fit within the X-10 "Extended Code 1" protocol?
A: Extended Code 1 has 16 different "types" most of which are undefined. Some of these "types" have been defined by X-10: For instance:
TYPE = 0 Shutters and Sunshades
TYPE = 1 Sensors
TYPE = 2 Reserved for Security
TYPE = 3 Control Modules (Dimmers and Appliances) . . .and so on.

ACT decided to use "Type B" for extended addressing.

Q: Will this mean that I will need special repeaters?
A: No. Long ago, ACT added "Extended Code 1" to its line of coupler repeaters. They will work just as they are, right now.

Q: How will we configure a new device for an extended address?
A: Since no desktop transmitter is capable of sending extended code, we at ACT anticipate that the installer will use either the AT004 or a computerized system with the TI103 as its powerline interface. For more information on the AT004, see: AT004 Specifications AT004 Installation Instructions

Q: Will all "extended address" devices configure the same way?
Yes, they will all configure the same way as far as the extended addressing is concerned. There are some differences since different products have different options, but as far as configuring the extended addressing they all use the same format.

Q: Will ACT "extended address" devices work with any other company's transmitters?
A: As of this writing, no. Although X-10's "Extended Code 1" is a published protocol, open to anyone who wishes to use it, no other company has, as yet, taken advantage of the extended addressing possibility. The ACT TI103 is an interface that will transmit any X-10 protocol message, standard and extended code, so it is recommended that any PCC system that will use extended addressing should also use the TI103 as its computer interface.

For more information on the TI103-RS232 and TI103-RS485, see:
TI103 Specifications
TI103 Installation Instructions

Q: Will ACT "extended address" devices work with standard commands?
A: Yes. For instance, when an "A1, A-On" command is received from the powerline, any receiver addressed to the standard code address (256 possible) "A1", will come "ON" (if not already ON). Any receiver addressed to an "extended address" starting with "A1" (meaning, "A1(00)" through "A1(0F)"), will also come "ON" (if not already ON). The same is true for the other standard command; "Off".

Q: Will ACT "extended address" devices work with global commands?
A: Yes. For instance, when an "A-All-Lts-On" command is received from the powerline, any receiver addressed to a standard address (256 possible) starting with Letter Code "A", and was configured to accept "All-Lts-On", will come "ON" (if not already ON). Any receiver addressed to an extended address (4,096 possible) starting with Letter Code "A", and was configured to accept "All-Lts-On", will also come "ON" (if not already ON). The same is true for all other "global" commands; "All-Lts-Off" and "All-Units-Off".

Q: Are ACT "extended address" devices 2-way?
A: Yes. For instance, when a standard "Status Request" command is sent, only a device addressed to a standard address will reply. Any receiver set to an extended address (4,096 possible) starting with "A1" (meaning, "A1(00)" through "A1(0F)"), will not reply. However, when an "Extended Code 1" Status Request command is received from the powerline, the receiver (only 1 per system) addressed to that "extended address", will respond with its current status. Any receiver addressed to a standard address will, of course, not respond.

More Info



  ACT Product Specifications Sheets

These files are in Adobe AcrobatTM format. If it's not already installed on your computer, click
here to get AcrobatTM.

Filters
Voltage 120v 208/240v 240v 50Hz 277v 480v
Plug-in, 5 amp AF100        
Plug-in, 15 amp AF120        
Wired, Blocking AF300 AF300 AF300 AF300  
Wired, Shunt AF310 AF310 AF310 AF310  
Wired, Choke AC100        
Receivers
Voltage 120v 208/240v 240v 50Hz 277v 480v
Dimmer 500w 2-wire RD101        
Dimmer 500w 3-wire RD104
RD161
       
Dimmer 300w Fixture mount RD114
RD110
       
Dimmer 2400 watt RD123        
Switch 20a Wall mount RS101
RS104
RS210  

RS301
RS310

 
Fixture mount

RF100
RF104  
RF114

RF204
RF214

RF214T

RF224

RF244

RF300  
RF304
 

RF310
 
RF314

 
Box mount, 4 relay, isolated contact RI104

RI304

RI304 RI304  
Box mount, isolated   RI223      
Box mount, 30 amp RB104 RB204
RB224
RB234
RB204
RB224
RB234
RB304 RB304
Box mount, 20 amp       RB310  
Transmitters
Voltage 120v 208/240v 240v 50Hz 277v 480v
Wall mount base TK124
TK184
TB100
TK224
TK284
TB300
TK324
TK384
TB300
TB300  
Wall Mount, 2 Button TK124 TK224 TK324  
Wall Mount 8 Button
Label Template
TK184
TC184
TK284   TK384  
64-chan Desktop TD140   TD240    
64-chan interface TI100   TI200    
Computer interface TU102   TU202    
Programmable, Wall TP110 TP210      
Multi-Channel Interface TB134 TB234 TB214
TB224
TB234
TB254
TB264
TB334  
Keypads (for TB100 & TB300)
Individual address, On/Off only With All-Lts-On / All-Units-Off Individ address with Dim/ Brt
Ivory White Ivory White Ivory White
TK000 TK001 TK010 TK011    
TK030 TK031     TK021
TK060 TK061 TK040 TK041 TK050 TK051
Coupler Repeaters
Voltage 120/240 split phase 120/208 3-phase 240/415 3-ph 50Hz 277/480 3-ph
CR230
CR234
CR254
CR134 CR244 CR334  
Passive Couplers
Voltage 120/240 split phase 120/208 3-phase 240/415 3-ph 50Hz 277/480 3-ph
CP000
CP010
CP020
CP000
CP010
CP020
CP000
CP010
CP020
CP000
CP010
CP020
CP400
 
Coupling Amplifiers
Voltage 120/240 split phase 120/208 3-phase 240/415 3-ph 50Hz 277/480 3-ph
CA000 CA000 CA200  
ACT Accessories
Test transmitter, A10 and X-10 AT001    
Test Receiver / Programmer / Logger AT004    
Oscilloscope Dual Trace PCC Adapter Scope-Test2    
Slave Switch (for any PCC 3-way Rcvr) AS001    
Multi-Voltage Transformer with Coupler AX000    
ACT Specialty Devices
RS232 Interface A10 Transceiver TI103-RS232    
Card Reader A10 Hotel Transceiver TH104
TH204
   

  ACT Product Installation Sheets

These files are in Adobe AcrobatTM format. If it's not already installed on your computer, click
here to get AcrobatTM.

Filters
Voltage 120v 208/240v 240v 50Hz 277v 480v
Plug-in, 5 amp AF100        
Plug-in, 15 amp AF120        
Wired, Blocking AF300 AF300 AF300 AF300  
Wired, Shunt AF310 AF310 AF310 AF310  
Wired, Choke AC100        
Receivers
Voltage 120v 208/240v 240v 50Hz 277v 480v
Dimmer 500w 2-wire RD101        
Dimmer 500w 3-wire RD104
RD161
       
Dimmer 300w Fixture mount RD114
RD110
       
Dimmer 2400 watt RD123        
Switch 20a Wall mount RS101
RS104
RS210  

RS301
RS310

 
Fixture mount

RF100
RF104  
RF114

RF204
RF214

RF214T

RF224

RF244

RF300  
RF304
 

RF310
 
RF314

 
Box mount, 4 relay, isolated contact RI104

RI304

RI304 RI304  
Box mount, isolated   RI223      
Box mount, 30 amp RB104 RB204
RB224
RB234
RB204
RB224
RB234
RB304 RB304
Box mount, 20 amp       RB310  
Transmitters
Voltage 120v 208/240v 240v 50Hz 277v 480v
Wall Mount TB100
TB300
TB300
TB300
 
Wall Mount, 2 Button TK124
TK224
TK324
 
Wall Mount 8 Button
Label Template
TK184
TC184
TK284
TC284
  TK384
TC384
 
64-chan Desktop TD140   TD240    
64-chan interface TI100   TI200    
Computer interface TU102   TU202    
Programmable, Wall TP110 TP210      
Multi-Channel Interface TB134 TB234 TB214
TB224
TB234
TB254
TB264
TB334  
Keypads (for TB100 & TB300)
Individual address, On/Off only With All-Lts-On / All-Units-Off Individ address with Dim/ Brt
Ivory White Ivory White Ivory White
TK000 TK001 TK010 TK011    
TK030 TK031     TK021
TK060 TK061 TK040 TK041 TK050 TK051
Coupler Repeaters
Voltage 120/240 split phase 120/208 3-phase 240/415 3-ph 50Hz 277/480 3-ph
CR230
CR234
CR254
CR134 CR244 CR334  
Passive Couplers
Voltage 120/240 split phase 120/208 3-phase 240/415 3-ph 50Hz 277/480 3-ph
CP000
CP010
CP020
CP000
CP010
CP020
CP000
CP010
CP020
CP000
CP010
CP020
CP400
 
Coupling Amplifiers
Voltage 120/240 split phase 120/208 3-phase 240/415 3-ph 50Hz 277/480 3-ph
CA000 CA000 CA200  
ACT Accessories
Test transmitter, A10 and X-10 AT001    
Test Receiver / Programmer / Logger AT004    
Oscilloscope Dual Trace PCC Adapter Scope-Test2    
Slave Switch (for any PCC 3-way Rcvr) AS001    
Multi-Voltage Transformer with Coupler AX000    
Phone Override Device (for use with TU102 and TU202) POD    
ACT Specialty Devices
RS232 Interface A10 Transceiver TI103-RS232    
Card Reader A10 Hotel Transceiver TH104
TH204
   
No products are currently available from this category.
Unavailable/discontinued items are listed below for your reference.

Additional Photos

CP000 - Large View

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