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Automation LCD Panel

Item # C-0904

This product has been discontinued.

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Product Description

Features
  • Program automation functions at unit without the need of a computer
  • Visual status of functions -input and output relays
  • Program automation functions at unit without the need of a computer

Overview

Alert the homeowner of arriving guests by providing a distinctive ring to each phone when the doorbell rings. Offer added security by simply including a Channel Vision Central intercom, surveillance camera and RF modulator to see who's at the front door. Channel Vision's extensive line of intercom products enable the installer to efficiently mount components into the home.

FAQ

Channel Vision Frequently Asked Questions

Topics:
Amplifiers and Splitters: FAQ

What does a splitter do?
A splitter takes one RF or television signal and multiplies it to your desired number. Channel Vision makes the highest quality RF splitters available. Please note: each time a coax cable is split the signal strength decreases. Additionally, the larger the splitter the more signal loss you will experience. Signal loss must be accounted for when designing an RF system.

My picture looks bad, do I need an amplifier?
Not necessarily. Remember ... garbage in - garbage out. If you put a poor signal into an amplifier it will only amplify the poor signal and in many cases make it worse. If your television picture looks "grainy" you may have too many splits in the signal or because the signal is travelling too far of a distance, an amplifier is the answer. Now you simply need to decide how much amplification is required for proper signal distribution. Please check our RF System Design Chart to calculate signal loss in a system.

What is the difference between a Channel Vision splitter and other brands?
Unlike the majority of inexpensive "off the shelf" splitters commonly found at various electronics retailers Channel Vision splitters are PCB based. That is, there is a sophisticated printed circuit board in every splitter to provide a very high level of isolation between signals. Better isolation means less chance for interference and distortion such as "ghosting" which is often caused by substandard splitters.

Connectors and Accessories: FAQ

What is an F Connector?
An "F" connector is the most common connector used to link coax cables to electronic devices. The F connector is threaded for easy connection to antennas, televisions, VCRs and CATV/RF splitters.

What is a BNC Connector?
A BNC connector is weather-proof twist lock coax connector commonly found on commercial video and surveillance equipment. With a simple twist, the BNC locks into place and provides the most secure way for connecting components and coax cables together.

What is an RCA Connector?
RCA connectors are most commonly used for connecting home theater components together, including: televisions, VCRs, satellite receivers, CD players and audio receivers. You can easily identify an RCA type connector as it is usually color-coded: Yellow (video), Red (audio left) and White (audio right).

What is a Low Pass Filter?
A low pass filter passes all television channels below a selected frequency. For instance, Channel Vision's model 3102-60 filter passes all channels below cable channel 60 while blocking everything above 60. A low pass filter is a "key" component for proper RF distribution where modulators are involved as it prevents broadcasted information from interfering with the "in house" modulated channels.

What is an Attenuator?
An attenuator is a passive, in-line device that decreases the amount of signal strength by a specified amount (usually expressed in dB). For instance, Channel Vision's model 3000-3 attenuates or reduces the incoming signal strength by 3dB. Attenuators are normally used after an amplifier in an RF system to decrease the signal to televisions located on short coax runs.

Distribution Panels: FAQ

What is an RF distribution Panel?
An RF distribution panel combines multiple modulated sources with an incoming television signal and sends the combined signal to multiple locations. Distances from the distribution point to each television tend to vary. In order to provide the proper amount of signal to each television set, the panel routes the signal through a variety of amplifiers, splitters, taps and attenuators.

At what point would a distribution panel make sense for me?
Commercial applications such as restaurants, sports bars, hotels, schools as well as large custom homes may require specific amplification for each television drop. Any system with over 8 televisions at distances farther than 100 feet from the distribution point are prime candidates for an RF distribution panel.

What size panels do you build?
Channel Vision makes two standard panels: a 3 input to 8 output and a 3 input to 12 output. We also build custom made-to-order distribution panels for larger systems. In fact, thousands of Channel Vision custom RF panels are installed in some of the most recognizable places and owned by some of the most well-known faces throughout North America.
Modulators: FAQ

What does a modulator do?
A modulator provides a very cost-effective way to distribute audio/video signals to multiple locations by creating a distinct television channel (Cable or UHF) for virtually any audio/video source. Viewing each source becomes as simple as changing the television channel.

My television isn't "cable ready", can I still use a modulator?
Yes. All Channel Vision modulators allow you to create UHF channels as well as cable channels. Or, if you use a cable box to tune to channels you can route the modulated channel around the box via a Channel Vision model 3101 cable box converter kit.

Sounds simple, can I install a modulator myself?
Maybe, if you are skilled in low-voltage installation techniques. Otherwise, we highly suggest that you consult one of our many professional installers.

Can I use more than one modulator in a system?
Yes. In fact you are only limited by the amount of unused channels in your area. Our modulators tune as high as cable channel 135 so it's not unusual for a homeowner to create channels for 9 or more sources such as satellite receivers, VCRs, DVD players and surveillance cameras. "Closed systems" that excludes broadcast television such as hotels and sports bars can create as many 30 channels for their in-house television networks.

Surveillance Cameras: FAQ

Should I buy a color or black and white camera?
Color cameras produce images that are more familiar to most people. However, color camera performance is subject to the available light within the surveillance area. Meaning that a color camera may be the right choice for an area with optimal lighting but may perform well below expectations when the lighting is poor. Black and white cameras, however, generally have a lower "Lux" rating meaning that they perform well under a variety of lighting conditions. Black and white cameras are less expensive than comparable color models.

What is the most versatile camera Channel Vision makes?
Channel Vision's most versatile and popular camera is our black and white bullet camera. The 5005 comes in black or white and includes a built-in 3.6mm wide-angle lens, universal mount and 12VDC power supply. It's aesthetic design applies to both interior and exterior surveillance applications. Additionally, the 5005 and the color version (model 6005) are waterproof so they perform extremely well in humid and/or wet climates.

Can I record a surveillance camera?
Absolutely. The beauty of modulating a CCTV camera is that the modulator creates a television channel for it. Which means that you can record the camera with a consumer-grade VCR. Simply program the VCR to record the camera channel for a selected period of time just as you would if you wanted to record the news on channel 4, it's just that simple.

Leaving your children with a babysitter? Before departing, change the channel on the VCR's tuner to the camera channel and press "Record". When you return you'll be able to view exactly what happened while you were away.

Channel Vision Telephone Entry Systems: FAQ

What is a telephone entry system?
A telephone entry system creates a communication link between an external intercom zone such as a front door or entry gate to every telephone in the home. When a visitor arrives and presses the doorbell, a distinctive sound is sent to the phones to alert the homeowner that someone is calling in from the intercom. With a Channel Vision system, the person inside the home can simply pick up any telephone handset and press a key to begin speaking to the visitor. Additionally, the Channel Vision system includes a relay closure to send a signal to an electronic door strike to release the lock on the door or entry gate.

Isn't telephone entry usually just for gated communities?
No. Actually, with improvements in technology teamed with mass production, telephone entry systems have become affordable for most homeowners. Channel Vision telephone entry systems are a cost-effective way to increase security while adding convenience in any home.

More Info



10 Common Problems Associated with Modulation
  1. TV on wrong frequency. Modulator set on UB/Catv TV on UHF or vise versa.
  2. Variable gain turned down to low to compensate for splitter loss, cable length.
  3. Multiple input modulators set on the same channel example 2 input mod channel set on 65 and 65. Channel must be at least 1 channel apart.
  4. Using the wrong low pass filter or no low pass filter.
  5. Installing a low pass filter post amp instead of pre-amp. Installation note: the dBmv level should exceed 5 dBmv and should not go below 5 dBmv at any frequency.
  6. The difference in dB level between Catv and modulation is greater that 10 dB causing cross talk.
  7. Unused channels on modulator set below the frequency of low pass filter.
  8. Difference in ground potential between Catv ground and modulators grounded AC plug.
  9. Modulated channel not programmed into TV - add the channel.
  10. And last, but not least, FITTINGS. Bad fittings can make or break an entire system.

Diagrams & Layouts

Channel Vision Glossary of Terms: Page 1

Pages A B-C D-F F-J K-N N-S S-V

60 Cycle Hum: These hum bars at 60 cycles are normally a result of dc power on the line. See dcBlocker.
A/B Switch: A switch that selects one of two inputs (A or B) for routing to a common output while providing adequate isolation between the two signals.
Adjacent Channel: An adjacent channel is one which is immediately next to another channel.
AFC: A circuit which locks an electronic component onto a chosen frequency.
AGC: Controlling the gain of a device by the signal level through the device (using a high gain feedback loop circuit). A rising input signal level produces a negative feedback signal, which lowers the gain. A circuit that uses feedback to maintain the output of an electronic component at a constant level.
Agile Component: A component which can be tuned to any desired channel.
Amplifier: A device used to increase the power of a signal.
Analog: A system in which signals vary continuously in contrast to a digital system in which signals vary in discrete steps.
Antenna: A device that contributes an energy gain. Satellite dishes, broadband antenna and cut-to-channel antennas are some types of antennas encountered in private cable systems.
Antenna Pre-Amplifier: An amplifier located in the immediate vicinity of the antenna, used to amplify extremely weak signals, thereby improving the signal-to-noise ratio of a system.
60 Cycle Hum: These hum bars at 60 cycles are normally a result of dc power on the line. See dcBlocker.
A/B Switch: A switch that selects one of two inputs (A or B) for routing to a common output while providing adequate isolation between the two signals.
Adjacent Channel: An adjacent channel is one which is immediately next to another channel.
AFC: A circuit which locks an electronic component onto a chosen frequency.
AGC: Controlling the gain of a device by the signal level through the device (using a high gain feedback loop circuit). A rising input signal level produces a negative feedback signal, which lowers the gain. A circuit that uses feedback to maintain the output of an electronic component at a constant level.
Agile Component: A component which can be tuned to any desired channel.
Amplifier: A device used to increase the power of a signal.
Analog: A system in which signals vary continuously in contrast to a digital system in which signals vary in discrete steps.
Antenna: A device that contributes an energy gain. Satellite dishes, broadband antenna and cut-to-channel antennas are some types of antennas encountered in private cable systems.
Antenna Pre-Amplifier: An amplifier located in the immediate vicinity of the antenna, used to amplify extremely weak signals, thereby improving the signal-to-noise ratio of a system.



Typical Residential RF System


Channel VisionTMRF System Upgrade


Diagram shows a typical residential audio/video system upgrade using a Channel Vision digital RF modulator. The modulator creates a distinct channel for each video source and is then combined with the antenna or cable signal for distribution throughout the home. Selecting any source from any television becomes as simple as changing the TV channel!


Channel Vision Trouble Shooting
Trouble shooting any system can make or break the entire installation. Here are the most common problems and solutions.


Snowy Picture : No Modulation
This is a problem of the TV and the modulator not "talking" to each other.

1. Verify the modulator is set up for the proper TV channel band. If the unit uses dip switches to set the channel band, was the unit powered down during or after the switches were reset to the proper band? If the unit uses a jumper check for proper placement.
2. Verify the TV is set up on the proper TV channel band. Use "Air" for UHF channels of Cable for Ultraband channels . The TV will have an on screen set-up menu or a switch for this function. Also make sure the modulated channel isn't blocked out by auto-programming. To check for the TV being set to the wrong band, go to the equivalent channel on the other band (i.e. to check 65 cable try 14 UHF).
3. Check TV manual to make sure TV works on channels above 65.
4. Check all connections for a good connection.
5. Check splitters and amplifiers for 1GHz rating.


Black Picture : No Modulation
In this case, the TV and the modulator are "talking" to each other. The video signal is not being passed through the system.

1. Verify good connections to the modulator from the video source. i.e. VCR.
2. Check video source (VCR, Sat Receiver etc.) by running the outputs directly into the video inputs on the TV. Verify video source is working.
3. Check for power at video source.
4. Disconnect modulator from system: A) Picture goes to snow, problem is between video source and inputs on the modulator. B) Picture stays black, hook up the modulator directly to a TV eliminating all the components of the system and check the picture.


Grainy Local Channels : Good Modulated Picture
Disconnect the modulator from the system and connect the local channel feed directly to the distribution system and check TV picture quality. If the picture quality is good the insertion loss of the combiner for the modulator is degrading the local channel signal. Use a CVT-15PIA to compensate for the insertion loss. The other alternative is to use a 9dB tap as the combiner, put the local channel feed on the pass through port for a minimal loss of signal connect the modulator to the tap off port. If the picture is still bad, check for a bad connection where leakage may occur or if the shielding braid is touching the center conductor.


Grainy Modulated Channel : Good Picture on the Cable Channels
1. Disconnect cable channels from the system and check the modulated channels. If the modulated channels are good, use a low pass filter to "clean-up" the incoming frequencies to be modulated. If the modulated channel does not improve after disconnecting the local channels, evaluate signal loss of modulator through the splitters and cable length of the system. Amplify after the combiner if needed. Also check the connections between modulator and the combiner for leakage or braid touching the center conductor.
2. Make sure the attenuator is turned to 0.
3. Check output strength with field strength meter.
4. Connect modulator directly to TV and check picture quality.
5. Check band width of all splitters and amplifiers for 1GHz capability.
6. Place TV cable setting on standard, NOT HRC or IRC.


TV Won't Tune High Enough to get Modulated Channel
1. Use an external tuner i.e. VCR or a Cable Box converter turner (#1172) to allow the TV to view modulated channel on channel 3 or 4.
2. If the modulated channel is beyond the capabilities for that TV, the TV will not work with the system.


Cable Company Box Won't Pass a Modulated Signal
1. Connect modulator directly to TV and verify the modulator is sending a signal the TV can receive.
2. Use model 3101 Cable Box Combiner Kit to route the modulated signal around the cable box. See schematic pages 4 & 5.


Cable Company Uses All Available Channels
1. Use a low pass filter (3102) to blockout channels 80 and above for clean modulation (won't effect channels 95-99).


Modulated Picture is Too Bright or Washed Out
1. Slide impedance switch to 75 ohm position
2. If modulator is a CVT set top style, adjust video level adjustment potentiometer on the bottom of the chassis.
3. If using a camera, check positioning of the lens to be sure it's not aimed at the sun or a reflection.
4. Adjust camera lens - see lens manual.


Modulated Picture is Too Dark
1. If baseband video is being split with a Stereo Loop Kit or loop through quad, set impedance matching switch (termination switch) to 1KW.
2. If modulator is a set top style, adjust video level adjustment potentiometer on the bottom of the chassis
3. If the video source is not being split, check input source directly into a TV
4. Adjust the video level adjustment pot on the chassis of the set top units to the proper brightness.
5. Check all connectors for 75 ohm.

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Additional Photos

C-0904 - Large View

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